18.9 C
Washington

Fargo says it doesn’t want its residents using their homes ‘as gun stores’ in lawsuit against North Dakota 

Date:

Share:



Fargo is suing the state of North Dakota over a new law that bans zoning ordinances related to guns and ammunition, continuing a clash over local gun control.

The state’s biggest city has an ordinance that bans people from selling guns and ammunition out of their homes. The Republican-controlled Legislature passed a law this year that limits cities and counties from regulating guns and ammunition. The law, which took effect Tuesday, also voids existing, related ordinances.

The city’s lawsuit says the “stakes are much higher” and gets at whether the Legislature can “strip away” Fargo’s home rule powers. Fargo voters approved a home rule charter in 1970 that gave the city commission certain powers, including the power to zone public and private property.

“As it relates to this present action, the North Dakota legislative assembly is upset that the City of Fargo has exercised its home rule powers to prohibit the residents of the City of Fargo – and no one else – from the home occupation of selling firearms and ammunition and the production of ammunition for sale,” the lawsuit states. “Effectively, the City of Fargo does not want its residents to utilize their homes in residential areas as gun stores.”

The city successfully challenged a similar law two years ago.

North Dakota Attorney General Drew Wrigley did not immediately respond to a phone message seeking comment about the lawsuit. A Fargo city spokesperson did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.

Bill sponsor and Republican state Rep. Ben Koppelman told a state Senate panel in April that the issue came to greater attention in 2016 when, because of the ordinance, the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives refused to renew the federal firearms licenses of Fargo dealers who sold out of their homes.

“What is at issue is whether we want local governments creating gun control or whether we want gun regulations to remain a state-controlled issue,” Koppelman said in April. “Without this bill and in light of the (2021) court opinion, I think local political subdivisions could propose all sorts of local gun control, and based on the anti-gun track record of the City of Fargo Commission, I think we could expect it.”

Koppelman did not immediately respond to a phone message for comment.

Subscribe to Well Adjusted, our newsletter full of simple strategies to work smarter and live better, from the Fortune Well team. Sign up today.



Source link

Subscribe to our magazine

━ more like this

Republican National Convention focuses on Trump’s economic plans

The first night of the Republican National Convention kept its official focus on the economy Monday even after Saturday’s shooting at a rally in Pennsylvania...

Bosses and employees have wildly different expectations about how much time they can save with AI

Have you ever felt a mismatch between your own expectations and those of your boss? With the proliferation of Generative AI, that mismatch...

The Xreal Beam Pro has good ideas about AR — but not enough juice

There are two possible paths for augmented reality devices. One path is the all-in-one approach, which you might call the smartphone path or...

Third Space’s CEO follows an 80/20 rule for eating out, competes in triathlons at 54-years-old and has made startup investments he regrets

What would you do if you had a six-figure salary? Perhaps you’d never cook another meal again or indulge in a monthly Thai...

Elon Musk is donating $45 million monthly to Trump-supporting PAC 

Tesla CEO Elon Musk donated $45 million to a super political action committee (PAC) dedicated to re-electing former President Donald Trump, a marked...